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By tonygold
#1101716
hi all
we have a townhouse in villamartin and currently (no pun intended!) our electricity supply is at 3.3kw. we're only there during summer months and this hasn't been an issue up to now, but when we went to use the oven on our last visit the fuse in the consumer unit kept tripping.

we have since been advised that the fuseboard has a 15amp main switch and the oven is 25amp so the supply into the house needs upgrading. been quoted for an electrician €140 for the board upgrade including certificate and taxes and been informed that iberdrola charge anything between €10-120? (not sure for what), that gets added to your bill.
can someone advise if this all sounds correct please?

will this upgrade mean we are now on 5.75kw and if so can someone advise the difference in the monthly standing charge etc between the 3.3kw and 5.75kw tariffs. we are not on night/day as our visits are not frequent enough to bother at the moment, so just on standard tariff.

many thanks for any info.
By alan p
#1101719
Hello Tony Has it only just started happening? If it didn’t trip before when you used the oven maybe its the oven that is the problem. My neighbour had the same thing happen and it turned out it was the elements in the oven that needed changing. Just a thought. Alan.
P.s Sorry if you had already thought about this.
By PeteKnight
#1101721
You calculate the wattage by multiplying the current by the voltage.
240 volts x 15 amps = 3,600 Watts (3.6kw).
That means you have the correct circuit breaker for your contracted supply.

A bit of googling comes-up with this:
“Ovens use 1000 to 5000 watts, with an average modern oven using around 2400 watts on medium to high heat”

A 2400 watt (2.4kw) oven would draw 10 amps of current (2400w/240 =10a), so you shouldn’t have a problem with a “typical” oven on your current contracted wattage. If you’re using a couple of rings on the hob at the same time then you might be getting near your 15a limit.
If you also have an electric water heater running, plus room heating then you’ll almost certainly be exceeding your limits.
The main 15a circuit breaker typically allows upto 40% more current to be drawn before it trips, so in reality you’re probably good for around 20 amps. If/when you have a smart meter fitted then these are much more precise and will trip the meter at much nearer to your contracted current.

It’s more likely that you have a faulty oven, as previously suggested, although I’d expect this to be tripping your earth leakage breaker rather than the main trip. There is a possibility that your main circuit breaker is faulty and it’s tripping at a lower current than it should, but this seems less likely.

If for some reason your oven is drawing 25a then I’d suggest you think about changing it for something a bit greener (unless of course its’s your Other Half’s pride and joy, in which case you should pay whatever is necessary to increase your supply capacity :)).

If you do go for a higher capacity then you’ll pay a higher standing charge and more for each unit of electricity that you use.

Pete.
By tonygold
#1101724
PeteKnight wrote:
Tue Nov 07, 2017 10:28 am
You calculate the wattage by multiplying the current by the voltage.
240 volts x 15 amps = 3,600 Watts (3.6kw).
That means you have the correct circuit breaker for your contracted supply.

A bit of googling comes-up with this:
“Ovens use 1000 to 5000 watts, with an average modern oven using around 2400 watts on medium to high heat”

A 2400 watt (2.4kw) oven would draw 10 amps of current (2400w/240 =10a), so you shouldn’t have a problem with a “typical” oven on your current contracted wattage. If you’re using a couple of rings on the hob at the same time then you might be getting near your 15a limit.
If you also have an electric water heater running, plus room heating then you’ll almost certainly be exceeding your limits.
The main 15a circuit breaker typically allows upto 40% more current to be drawn before it trips, so in reality you’re probably good for around 20 amps. If/when you have a smart meter fitted then these are much more precise and will trip the meter at much nearer to your contracted current.

It’s more likely that you have a faulty oven, as previously suggested, although I’d expect this to be tripping your earth leakage breaker rather than the main trip. There is a possibility that your main circuit breaker is faulty and it’s tripping at a lower current than it should, but this seems less likely.

If for some reason your oven is drawing 25a then I’d suggest you think about changing it for something a bit greener (unless of course its’s your Other Half’s pride and joy, in which case you should pay whatever is necessary to increase your supply capacity :)).

If you do go for a higher capacity then you’ll pay a higher standing charge and more for each unit of electricity that you use.

Pete.
great info (as usual pete) thank you.
tbh my other half never uses the oven as she states ' i'm on holiday also, so i don't want to cook'. fair enough. but we tried to warm some plates on our last visit which is when it tripped out. i honestly can't say when it was last used before that. it certainly is not a high end powerful oven (edesa) so rather than leap in and get the electricity upgraded i think i will wait until i am next out to sort this out.

does anyone know who i could contact to get this checked out. i don't have a lot of faith now in the guy that has given me this info. the oven last tripped in september. it was very warm out and no other appliances were on other than some lights.
By alan p
#1101725
Hello again Tony,
My neighbour phoned someone from one of the free papers and he fitted the oven with new elements which sorted out the tripping but the man also smashed the oven door glass and didn’t offer to get a replacement just said if you get another one he would fit it free of charge. If I ever need a plumber or electrician I call in Euronics shop and ask them if they could recommend anyone. Alan.
By tonygold
#1101727
alan p wrote:
Tue Nov 07, 2017 11:27 am
Hello again Tony,
My neighbour phoned someone from one of the free papers and he fitted the oven with new elements which sorted out the tripping but the man also smashed the oven door glass and didn’t offer to get a replacement just said if you get another one he would fit it free of charge. If I ever need a plumber or electrician I call in Euronics shop and ask them if they could recommend anyone. Alan.
thanks alan. will check into euronics when next out unless anyone can recommend anybody else?
thanks.
By PeteKnight
#1101732
I’d say that it’s probably cheaper, and better in the long run, to get a replacement oven.
They’re very easy to swap out - usually a few screws at the front securing it into the cabinet then the connections into the mains supply.
If the elements have gone in your existing oven then chances are they the thermostat and switches are also on ther way out. A newer one will probably be more efficient and have better insulation as well.

We bought ours from Ikea. We went for the cheapest model - like you we don’t do much cooking indoors while we’re here.

Pete.
By Info
#1101734
Tony Did you pull out all other appliances and try the oven on its own as that will be the only way of isolating it down to the oven. It could also be just plain overload on your system with too many high wattage appliances going at the same time. Daniel Snell is the electrician who has been recommended on here many times 697543723. The 5.5Kw potencia will be almost double what your standing charge is now.

Bee
By Daniel14
#1101736
I had the same problem with my oven. The switch tripped every time and eventually the hob gave up as well. I called Daniel Snell and the first thing the electrician asked was how often the oven is used. I said 'never' and he said it has to be used once or twice a week otherwise humidity builds up and it will stop working. They fixed the problem, took about 1 hour, cost 40€. That was a few months ago and both oven and hob are still working.
#1101739
230V, not 240. The old 3.3Kw for 15A was based on the old Spanish voltage of 220v.
Therefore properties on 3.3Kw will still be charged for that even though they now have 3.45Kw. Spain never used the 240v system.

However, your standing order charge (the amount you pay for the power contracted for) will be based on the higher power.
Charges (on my last bill) were 12 cents per kw per day. So your 3.3Kw contract would cost just under 40cents a day. If you upgrade to the next level of 5.75Kw then the daily charge would be nearer 70 cents a day.
That's an increase from 12 euro a month up to 21 euro a month.
Of, course, they add taxes and VAT etc on those prices so 5.75Kw (25A) is more like 24 or 25 euro a month.
That's before you plug anything in.
By tonygold
#1101742
Great info and advice. I thank you all. This is a great forum!! Im sure i tried turning all else off and the oven still tripped out so hopefully it is just that. I would rather replace the oven than upgrade the power.
I just hope i don't replace the oven to find its still happening!!
By faolteam
#1101753
PeteKnight wrote:
Tue Nov 07, 2017 10:28 am
You calculate the wattage by multiplying the current by the voltage.
240 volts x 15 amps = 3,600 Watts (3.6kw).
That means you have the correct circuit breaker for your contracted supply.

A bit of googling comes-up with this:
“Ovens use 1000 to 5000 watts, with an average modern oven using around 2400 watts on medium to high heat”

A 2400 watt (2.4kw) oven would draw 10 amps of current (2400w/240 =10a), so you shouldn’t have a problem with a “typical” oven on your current contracted wattage. If you’re using a couple of rings on the hob at the same time then you might be getting near your 15a limit.
If you also have an electric water heater running, plus room heating then you’ll almost certainly be exceeding your limits.
The main 15a circuit breaker typically allows upto 40% more current to be drawn before it trips, so in reality you’re probably good for around 20 amps. If/when you have a smart meter fitted then these are much more precise and will trip the meter at much nearer to your contracted current.

It’s more likely that you have a faulty oven, as previously suggested, although I’d expect this to be tripping your earth leakage breaker rather than the main trip. There is a possibility that your main circuit breaker is faulty and it’s tripping at a lower current than it should, but this seems less likely.

If for some reason your oven is drawing 25a then I’d suggest you think about changing it for something a bit greener (unless of course its’s your Other Half’s pride and joy, in which case you should pay whatever is necessary to increase your supply capacity :)).

If you do go for a higher capacity then you’ll pay a higher standing charge and more for each unit of electricity that you use.

Pete.
Hi Pete when you say A 2400 watt (2.4kw) oven would draw 10 amps of current (2400w/240 =10a) , Can you tell me how many Amps is that based on a minute, ten minutes etc
#1101755
faolteam wrote:
Tue Nov 07, 2017 10:44 pm


Hi Pete when you say A 2400 watt (2.4kw) oven would draw 10 amps of current (2400w/240 =10a) , Can you tell me how many Amps is that based on a minute, ten minutes etc
Ermmm. 10A, It's not an adding up thing and you don't get charged for the Amps, that is , the current. That is always there as is the voltage.
It's the wattage (the power) that adds up. If you have a 1Kw fire it will use 1Kw per hour. If you have a 3.6Kw item (like an oven) it will use 3.6Kw per hour.
Your bill will show how much power you have used which is the current multiplied by the voltage.
By PeteKnight
#1101761
faolteam wrote:
Tue Nov 07, 2017 10:44 pm
Hi Pete when you say A 2400 watt (2.4kw) oven would draw 10 amps of current (2400w/240 =10a) , Can you tell me how many Amps is that based on a minute, ten minutes etc
It’s a constant consumption figure. Every second that a 2400w appliance is being used it is drawing 10 amps of current.

In a domestic setting, the only units that are usually time-based are Kilowatt Hours. If you use a 2,400 watt (2.4kw) oven for one hour you’ll have used 2.4 kWh (Kilowatt Hours) of energy. These are the units that your electricity supplier will use on your bill.

The only time that you’d measure amps over time is when you’re looking at battery power capacity when you’d talk about the capacity in Amp Hours. A 10 amp/hour battery can deliver 1 amp for 10 Hours, or 10 amps for 1 hour, but amps over time isn’t something that you’d normally think about in a mains power environment.

Hope this helps.

Pete.
By tonygold
#1101762
Info wrote:
Tue Nov 07, 2017 1:08 pm
Tony Did you pull out all other appliances and try the oven on its own as that will be the only way of isolating it down to the oven. It could also be just plain overload on your system with too many high wattage appliances going at the same time. Daniel Snell is the electrician who has been recommended on here many times 697543723. The 5.5Kw potencia will be almost double what your standing charge is now.

Bee
thanks bee.
i will give david a call on my next visit to see if it is just a faulty element (presuming he does oven repairs that is?)

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